Best Pokémon Games (Updated 2020)

Summary List

It is no shock that, prior to release, Pokémon titles become the most widely anticipated games in the industry. Pokémon’s ability to generate excitement is due to its passionate fan base. This fan base is unique in that it grows exponentially with each new release. The game continues to be accessible to beginners. So much so that it sometimes angers hardcore gamers. However, the diehards always give in, no matter how old or experienced they become. Simply put, it's hard to ignore a new generation of Pokémon.

As Nintendo’s handheld consoles have evolved, from the Game Boy to Nintendo Switch, so have the best Pokémon games. The game’s original aesthetics of black and white 8-bit graphics have come a long way. Although the technology has improved, Pokémon developer Game Freak has managed to continually capture the charisma that captivated millions in Pokémon Blue and Red.

The best Pokémon games are all unique in their own way, yet they share similar formulas. The addition of new creatures at the onset of each generation helps keep things fresh. Players form bonds with their Pokémon as they take down evil organizations and defeat gym leaders on the road to becoming champion. Some things do not need to change to be appreciated. As such, these are the best Pokemon games.

Every new generation attempts to improve adapt and innovate on the game that came before it. In the case of the fourth generation, Diamond and Pearl introduced new features that would change the franchise as we knew it. Pokémon Pearl was the first of two generations to appear on the Nintendo DS. The new system brought some much-needed graphic improvements. Pokemon games do not live and die by their graphics however the Sinnoh region certainly looked pretty. Although there are several important changes in this generation, the Pokémon formula remains the same. Catch Pokémon, train your party, challenge gym leaders, beat the elite four and voila. For some this may be disappointing however the sale numbers over the years offer no indication that the formula must be refreshed.

In terms of changes to gameplay, the DS’s touch screen allows for navigating the menu with ease. Any RPG fan knows how important this is. Accessing items or checking your Pokemon’s status has never been easier. Additionally, for the first time ever battling is now accessible via the Internet. Previously, players had to battle in the same room connected by a cable. Now, any player with a Wi-Fi connection can battle online. Unfortunately, this function is limited by the fact that you can only trade and battle alongside trainers that you’ve exchanged a friend code with. However, the biggest change was introduced via the battling system. Pearl introduced the famed physical/special split. Prior to this every type in the game was either physical or special in nature. Pearl allowed for all types to have both special and physical moves. This change would enhance the strategic battling element of the Pokémon series. With 40 hours of gameplay to delve into, Pearl is a solid addition to the franchise.

Key Features
  • Noticeable graphic upgrade from predecessor
  • First Pokemon game to incorporate online via Wifi
  • New touch screen menu on DS
  • 40 hours of gameplay
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Navigating menu with touch screen
  • Physical/Special split adds depth
  • Evolving Pokemon requires trade with simple with Wifi
  • Sinnoh region looks stunning
Cons
  • Can only battle against friends online

Although this game technically belongs to the fourth generation of the Pokémon franchise, SoulSilver is a remake of generation two. Mainline Pokémon games fall into three categories. The first is a release of a brand new generation. The second is an enhanced version of the current generation that usually releases two years after the original. Finally we have the remake category, which releases as an updated version of an earlier generation. SoulSilver falls into the third category.

SoulSilver takes everything that made Pokémon Silver a classic and adds some minor improvements. The content available to discover is as vast as one can expect from a Pokémon game. This game houses two fully-fledged regions for the price of one. Most Pokémon games will introduce one new region. However Game Freak ingeniously incorporated the beloved Kanto region from the first generation into this game. Fans were blessed with the ability to explore both the Johto and Kanto regions. Of course this underdeveloped Kanto acts as more of an afterthought but it is still much appreciated. SoulSilver did not necessarily introduce any groundbreaking new features. As a remake and not a new generation, it did not have to. However one of the new features fell short of the mark. The first Pokémon in your party now follows your character in the over world. Besides being able to see your cute Pokémon companion, this feature had little impact on gameplay and was ultimately deemed rather useless.

SoulSilver acts as an incredibly polished version of the much-loved second generation. Game Freak also included the ability to challenge gym leaders after you’ve completed the game. This added to its replay value. As a remake, SoulSilver achieved its goal of offering nostalgia to old-school players while drawing in new ones. Though if you’re looking for surprises and innovation you won’t find them here.

Key Features
  • Remastered version of classic Pokemon Silver
  • Explore both the Johto and Kanto regions
  • Trade in Pokemon from generations three and four after completing the game
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Captures magic of original and modernizes it
  • Adds replay value by allowing player to challenge gym leaders and elite four after they are defeated
  • Perfect for both experts and newcomers
Cons
  • New feature of Pokemon following protagonist added little to gameplay
  • Lack of surprises

Pokémon Blue is the game that started it all. Developed by newcomers Game Freak and published by Nintendo, Pokémon Blue and Red released in 1996 and would spawn one of the most successful video game franchises of all time. Pokémon Blue would be the game accredited with bringing RPGs to the West. The game was immediately met with high praise and seemingly overnight the Pokémon brand was born. This brand has since become a multi billion-dollar franchise. To this day we’ve seen Pokémon merchandise, trading cards, movies, television shows and much, much more. So what made the original game so special?

First and foremost it was like nothing anyone’s seen before. Everything from the catching system to the battle system was refreshing. Pokémon Blue was addicting due to its ability to make collectors out of us all. The ability to trade with players via cable was ingenious. Suddenly classrooms were filled with students obsessed with trading their newest creatures. And so the Pokémon craze began. Although the goal of catching them all was a huge achievement, the main attraction was battling with friends via the aforementioned cable. The ability to link handheld gaming consoles was groundbreaking at the time.

The music introduced in Blue is truly iconic and one of the best features the game has to offer. The audio quality is below average. However the charm and unique melodies are on full display. A similar phenomenon occurred with the graphics aspect. The visuals are far from stunning yet they are endearing to all who lay their eyes on the game. The 8-bit graphics had a magical way of demanding your appreciation. What made these games so appealing was their ability to draw in beginners and hardcore gamers alike. There is no doubt in my mind that Pokémon is responsible for creating countless new gamers that would not have embraced the world of video games if it weren’t for the masterpiece that is Pokémon Blue.

Key Features
  • 8-bit charm
  • Iconic music
  • Introduction to Pokemon franchise
  • Trade and battle via cable
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Simple catching system easy to grasp
  • Difficulty progression is perfect
  • Completing the Pokédex becomes an addiction
  • Complex enough for experts without turning beginners away
Cons
  • Although charming, audio and visual quality are outdated

Pokémon games are decidedly cliché and formulaic when it comes to narrative. When Pokémon Black introduced gamers to the fifth generation of Pokémon, nobody could have predicted the captivating story it would tell. For the first time the villains were more than afterthoughts. They directly impacted the storytelling. What’s more is Black introduced heavy themes of ethics and morality. These were far from traditional additions to the Pokémon franchise. This appealed to the grown up audience while not overcomplicating things for kids who would no doubt get their hands on the game. As with every new generation, the gameplay formula remained the same. However minor changes were brought forth in order to enhance the experience. One of those changes is the introduction of seasons. Certain Pokémon were only available in the spring while others were exclusive to winter.

Although the graphics did not improve drastically from the previous generation, the season-based environments were a nice visual touch.

Black also introduced triple battles and rotation battles. Both of these new entries felt forced and lacked a smooth integration toward the battle system. It’s no surprise that this was the last time we would see both of those battle styles. Whereas the introduction of double battles in generation three became a standard feature, Game Freak knew that they failed with triple and rotation battles. Interestingly enough the Unova region was the first to be based on a geographic location outside of Japan. New York City served as inspiration for game developer Junichi Masuda. Unfortunately, the Unova region did not display the most appealing Pokémon. In terms of aesthetics, the fifth generation introduced a weak lineup of Pokémon. Ultimately, Black follows the trend of being a fantastic addition to the franchise without ever introducing drastic new elements. Game Freak’s strategy is simple, refine what works and do not change what isn’t broken.

Key Features
  • The most captivating narrative you'll find in a Pokemon game
  • In game seasons introduced for the first time
  • Unova becomes first region based on territory outside of Japan
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Villains are well thought out
  • Variety of in game settings
  • Battle mechanics
Cons
  • Triple battles and rotation battles failed as new features
  • Aesthetically weak showing for new generation Pokemon

The third generation of Pokémon games was presented to us at an awkward period in Nintendo’s platform lifespan. Historically, each handheld console would be home to two generations of Pokémon games. The Game Boy Advance is the only platform to date that only featured one mainline Pokémon game. The Game Boy Advance was released as a metaphoric band-aid to Nintendo’s handheld problem. The Game Boy color was in dire need of an upgrade but their highly anticipated Nintendo DS would not be ready for several years. Instead of a giant leap to the next generation, Nintendo offered a slight upgrade. With that being said Sapphire should not be underestimated, as it can hold its own in Nintendo’s Pokemon library.

To begin, the Hoenn region offers what is now regarded as the best starter trio of all time. Not only were Mudkip, Torchic and Treecko well-designed from an artistic standpoint, but they were also incredibly powerful and useful in-game. The same compliments can be shared for the remaining cast of new Pokémon. In terms of design and variety Game Freak exceeded expectations. Other successful new features include double battles, natures and abilities. All of these can be seen in every ensuing release thus proving their importance. Sapphire exhibits a rare glimpse of innovation. The additions of abilities and natures were particularly groundbreaking. They added newfound depth to battle strategy and helped mold the competitive scene into the thriving landscape it is today.

Once again, we have extremely addictive gameplay. The tradeoff for that in Sapphire’s case is weak graphics. The textures are bright and colorful, but the animation quality is disappointing. Another common gripe with this game is the inability to import Pokémon from past games. Many believed this could have extended the games replay value. Considering the game lacks a genuine challenge from start to finish the ability to keep people playing after they’ve completed the game would have increased Sapphire’s popularity.

Key Features
  • Weather introduced in battle for the first time
  • Abilities and natures increased Pokemon individuality
  • Team Magma and Aqua marked the departure from Team Rocket for the first time
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Best starter trio of all time
  • Battle strategy entered whole new level of depth due to abilities and natures
  • Gameplay remains as addictive as ever, training Pokemon never gets old
Cons
  • Game Boy Advance limited Sapphire's graphic potential
  • Inability to import Pokemon from past games

Pokémon Sword is yet another victim of high expectations. Don’t get the wrong idea; the game is a fantastic addition to the Pokémon franchise. However the anticipation that built surrounding the first ever mainline Pokémon game to be released on a home console was always going to overshadow the game itself. The eighth generation got a lot of things right. For example the open world introduced as the Wild Area was a great addition and something fans had been craving for years. Catching a variety of Pokémon no longer seemed like a daunting task. Well that would be true if Game Freak decided to include a variety of Pokémon.

Sword and Shield drew immense controversy leading up to its release. Contrary to past Pokémon games, Game Freak decided to significantly cut the Pokedex down to a select few. Furthermore the ability to transfer Pokémon into the game via traditional channels would not work as it usually did. Pokémon fans thought they were finally getting a massive experience with eight generations of Pokémon on a home console. Instead, they got a tiny version of that. Furthermore, the graphics and animation were extremely disappointing. Game Freak had been exposed for using art and animation from generation 7’s Sun and Moon. Meanwhile, the new battle feature, titled "Dynamax," was seen as nothing more than a cheap gimmick. Previous generations introduced fan favorites like Mega Evolutions and Z-moves. Version exclusive gym leaders turned out to be a nice touch that debuted in Sword and Shield.

Luckily for Nintendo, Pokémon Sword and Shield hit the online features out of the park. Battling online is now the smoothest it’s ever been. With a ranked system in place, climbing the ladder is truly addictive. The original music is also a highlight. The Galar region is based on the United Kingdom and the music perfectly encapsulates that area. Furthermore this game in particular is incredibly accessible to newcomers. The game feels incredibly easy. Without the option to change the difficulty hardcore fans can breeze through the game with ease, which ultimately feels rather cheap. Backlash from fans across the world did not hinder sale numbers. Sword and Shield have quickly become the fourth best selling game in franchise history.

Key Features
  • Online battling is the most accessible it's ever been
  • First ever mainline Pokemon game on a home console
  • Wild Area offers open world concept for catching Pokemon
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Ranked online play
  • Incredible original music
  • Difficulty level makes game welcoming for young gamers
Cons
  • Animation and graphics are a let down on the Switch
  • Downsizing of Pokedex is tragic considering how vast the game is

For many, FireRed will forever be viewed as an afterthought of the Game Boy Advance era. Forgotten as a bonus game for fans disappointed by the release of a single generation on the platform. However, there is so much more to appreciate when it comes to FireRed. After all, it is the remake of the beloved Pokémon Red, which initiated the Pokémon craze back in 1996.

The concept of FireRed must be praised. Game Freak took a risk with their first ever remake of a previously released game. They entered new territory and found success there. Consequently, we’ve seen remakes of the first, second, and third generation all while fans grow increasingly eager to hear the news of a fourth generation remake.

In terms of lack of improvement, the trend of graphic inadequacy continues with FireRed. This theme persistently sticks with the franchise. FireRed also fails to deliver any new twists or surprises. The beloved gameplay and in game creatures keep the franchise from becoming stale. The traditional aspect of FireRed is its best selling point. Essentially, we are reliving the same story and defeating the same gyms that we fell in love with for the first time. With a new Pokémon game, the fanbase expects new Pokémon. With FireRed being a remake, fans were deprived of this. The remake factor works as a double-edged sword. Game Freak is offering the experience to relive past memories and indulge in nostalgia. However, the Pokémon are the same, the story is the same, and nothing new really happens. As such, it was mostly hardcore fans that were attracted to this title. Newcomers should probably go for a full-fledged Pokémon experience before picking up FireRed.

Key Features
  • First remaster of a previous title in the Pokémon franchise
  • Added color and much needed liveliness to original Pokémon Red
  • Post game includes Pokémon from following generations
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Appealed to the most beloved generation of Pokémon
  • Nostalgia factor
  • Updates the battle system to match generation three yet still leaves us with the traditional story
Cons
  • Graphics still left much to be desired
  • Newcomers may want to opt for full fledged experience

The third title of a new generation is often called the enhanced version. In this case Platinum is the enhanced version of generation four games Diamond and Pearl. Historically, enhanced versions have not been met with critical acclaim. The two previous iterations, titled Crystal and Emerald, failed to improve on their respective generations. These games are mainly seen as a tactical maneuver orchestrated by Game Freak in order to maximize profits. Platinum permanently changed that narrative. Platinum introduced major changes to the fourth generation.

Thanks to the Global Trade System, players could now anonymously trade online without requiring a friend code. This facilitated the process of trading and made it more appealing to catch them all. Players were no longer restricted to those in their friend list. Furthermore the Vs. Recorder introduced the function of recording online battles. This made it easier for gamers to share knowledge and battle strategies. Content creation also rose to the forefront with the release of Platinum. The ability to record online battles were great for YouTube creators looking to post battle content online. The story remained mainly the same bar the inclusion of new legendary Pokémon Giratina and The Distortion World. Giratina isn’t the only new Pokémon; Nintendo decided to include a number of Pokémon from past titles to expand on Diamond and Pearl’s Pokédex.

Platinum succeeds in providing a new and amazing experience for those who did not get to play Diamond or Pearl. However, it goes beyond that by offering value even to those who enjoyed those titles.

Key Features
  • The most polished game generation four has to offer
  • Giratina and the Dream World are now accessible
  • Global trade system and Vs. recorder are wonderful additions
  • Pokédex expands on Diamond and Pearl
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Tons of value for an enhanced version even for those who played Diamond and Pearl
  • Ability to trade and battle with those outside of friend list
  • Vs. recorder promotes growth of battle strategy
Cons
  • Graphics are lackluster in comparison to other games on the system

Innovation is not often a word associated with the Pokemon franchise. However Sun brought about a drastic change to the game’s objective. Sun marked a huge shift in how the game is supposed to be played. The seventh generation takes place in the region of Alola. The first notable change is the geographic departure of towns and cities. Traditionally, the player would move in a linear path across several towns, collecting badges along the way. Alola is comprised of five islands. Furthermore, Game Freak removed the goal of collecting gym badges. Instead, the protagonist was tasked with completing island trials. These trials essentially acted as gym badges but it was refreshing to have them presented in this new form. Sun also excelled at adding several new gameplay features. Z-moves were introduced as incredibly powerful moves able to knock out opposing Pokémon with one hit. Although this one time per battle move was incredibly useful, many criticized the animation sequence for being too long.

The new cast of Pokémon are interesting enough, but the real highlight is the large number of Legendary/Mythical Pokémon. The game featured two traditional legendary creatures but it also introduced a number of high-powered Pokémon called Ultra Beasts. These Pokémon are difficult to catch, but they perform extremely well in battle. Game Freak did not stop there; they also introduced region exclusive versions of past Pokémon for the first time. This presented a new design for fan favorite Pokémon such as Meowth and Raichu.

Finally, the cherry on top of this Pokémon-themed cake is the arrival of Poké Ride. Poké Ride allowed the player to call on specially trained Pokémon to perform tasks such as flying, surfing and moving large boulders. This eliminated the need to keep a HM oriented Pokémon on your team. Pokémon known as Bibarels across the Pokémon universe breathed a collective sigh of relief.

Key Features
  • Poké Ride allows players to borrow Pokemon for various tasks
  • Regional form of past Pokémon introduced in Alola
  • Non traditional island format
  • Complete island trials instead of collecting badges
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Poké Ride eliminates need for HM exclusive Pokémon
  • Innovated the main objective
  • Z-moves perfectly balanced gameplay and added new depth to battling
  • Inclusion of Ultra Beasts, Legendary Pokémon and Mythical Pokémon
Cons
  • Z-move animations can feel tedious to sit through
  • Little to no content past the main story

Pokémon Y does not often get the praise it deserves. With Pokémon Y, the franchise was embarked on a new journey that would take place on the 3DS. The 3DS offered new avenues of graphic improvement and boy were fans in for a treat. The sixth generation takes place in the Kalos region, which is inspired by France. In terms of plot, Y does not do much to change the Pokémon formula. However, Y does offer new gameplay experiences.

With this installment, we are introduced to the concept of Mega Evolutions. This is a perfect example of Game Freak shaking up the system without deviating from its tradition. Mega Evolutions were a huge hit. Pokémon who could access Mega Evolution would transform in appearance mid battle. They would also be on the receiving end of a drastic boost in the stats department. Not only was the move executed brilliantly from an artistic standpoint but it also seamlessly impacted the game’s strategy. In addition, for the first time in history it seemed like nobody had an issue with the game’s graphics. Much of this had to do with the long awaited debut of 3D animations on the 3DS. Pokémon games had a history of being underdeveloped in the graphics department. Pokémon Y finally harnessed all the raw power of the handheld device that operated the game. Towns, gyms and battles all oozed personality by displaying vibrant colors and animations. It’s a shame that in terms of plot and story progression of Y sees the Pokémon franchise revert to old habits. This is extremely upsetting considering its predecessor in Black and White provided the best narrative to transpire in a Pokémon game.

Key Features
  • Stunning graphics brought to life by the 3DS
  • Adds a new feature called Mega Evolutions
  • Discover the Kalos region based on France
Specifications
  • Genre: Role-playing
  • Mode: Single-player, multiplayer
  • Rating: Everyone
  • Publisher: Nintendo
Pros
  • Art and animation breathe new life into the franchise
  • Mega Evolutions expertly integrated into the battle system
  • Giving Pokémon such as Charizard Mega Evolutions reignites interest in older fans
Cons
  • Storytelling takes a step back after the immense success of Black and White

In many ways, Pokémon has transcended video game status. It’s more than just a video game isn’t it? The Pokémon anime has been around for an impressive 22 seasons. The trading card game has maintained its relevance throughout the years. A remarkable accomplishment considering it supports competitive play as well as casual collectors. Yet, no matter how much the Pokémon world expands, the mainline video games will forever be the main attraction.

If It’s Not Broken Don’t Fix It

With every new generation, Pokémon reminds people why it’s a multi-billion dollar franchise. There are those who welcome the game with open arms and there are those who simply want more good ol' Pokémon. Further, one thing that stays the same is sales numbers. Whether the public hates or loves the games, they are wildly popular.

While it's easy to shrug and say that Pokémon developer Game Freak may just be in it for the profits, the quality of each game speaks for itself. Reviews also indicate the series' consistent level of quality. The best Pokémon games have one thing in common when it comes to reviewer feedback. And that would be a lack of innovation. Yet, despite that, Pokémon games are still successful, both critically and commercially.

What Makes a Winning Formula?

Iconic music? Check. Addictive gameplay? Check. Impeccably original art design? Check. Well, if it was that simple, why haven’t other companies offered the same package? The thing that makes the Pokémon experience excellent is the presentation. The way in which all of these aspects come together is what makes Pokémon magical. The combination of these strengths occurs effortlessly. The sum of its parts ideology truly shines. Credit to Game Freak and Nintendo for creating a harmonious equation time and time again.

Unique Replay Value

Pokémon is distinct when it comes to goal-setting for gamers. The main idea remains the same throughout each game. Catch Pokémon, train them, challenge gym leaders, and eventually become the champion of the region. However, there is a far more difficult challenge offered to those who seek to complete the game: completing the Pokédex.

After all, the best Pokémon games are about exploring the region and collecting the creatures that you encounter. One cannot say the game is complete if the Pokédex is not full. This secondary challenge acts as an incentive for players to keep coming back to the game. Filling out the Pokédex is no easy task, especially when some of the Pokémon are of legendary status. You may only get one chance at catching said Pokemon, so make it count.

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About The Author
Luca Di Marzo (48 Articles Published)

Earned my BA in English Literature at Concordia University in 2019. I have written for ReviewThis, WinningBetPicks and CBR. I can't seem to get enough of reading and writing. Let's add coffee to the list.

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